Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having a pale color

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • We may need to try to mitigate environmental damage of growth, but to decide that the present distribution of wealth and power was handed down by a pale-hued God seems unfair.

    You Just Can't Make This Stuff Up

  • The great canopy with its faintly coloured fringes seemed to sink lower and lower upon the garden beyond, until what had recently been a clear and pale-hued winter sky was left in a few silver ribbons and rags like a sickly sunset.

    The Complete Father Brown

  • Mudge was dicing several large, pale-hued jellyfish which had washed up on shore.

    The Time of the Transference

  • There was some tawdry jewellery lying about, and several pairs of the pale-hued Parisian boots she invariably affected.

    The Hippodrome

  • At one lonely place we passed a small shelter, a roof of yellow matting supported by a few posts, containing six rather pale-hued women with richly coloured robes and bangles seated in a semi-circle on the ground.

    In Mesopotamia

  • The full, lustrous face, with the bright black coronet, looked down like that of a divinity well pleased to be worshipped, on the pale-hued, small-featured face that was turned up to it.

    III. The Wavering Balance. Book V—Wheat and Tares

  • She wore a very dainty gown of cream muslin with pale-hued roses on it ... a gown which would have seemed ridiculously juvenile on most women of her age, but which suited Miss Lavendar so perfectly that you never thought about it at all.

    Anne of Avonlea

  • On fast days he wore pale-hued garments, changed his food, and made a change in his apartment.

    The World's Greatest Books — Volume 13 — Religion and Philosophy

  • She wore a very dainty gown of cream muslin with pale-hued roses on it ... a gown which would have seemed ridiculously juvenile on most women of her age, but which suited

    Anne of Avonlea

  • The grass glows with a more vivid green, and, in answer to a ringing call from Tony, his sisters fluttering over the daisies in pale-hued muslins, come out of their ever-open door, like pretty pigeons from a dovecote.

    Children's Literature A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes

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