Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A plural of palladium2.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of palladium.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Plural of.palladium.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It's called palladia, and it's manufactured by Pfizer's animal health division.

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  • Been grooving to some amazing palladia music all night here.

    Poll: Obama Has Banked Big Lead In Early Vote

  • These, as palladia, had been assigned the first place in the carriage, and the deputies sat before them on the back seat with becoming reverence.

    The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to Prose, Vol. VIII (of X) - Continental Europe II.

  • The constitution satisfied them in the main: they boasted of the palladia of their liberties, 'trial by jury' and the

    The English Utilitarians, Volume I.

  • By instinct, rather than conscious reasoning, Englishmen had felt their way to establishing the 'palladia of our liberties': trial by jury, the 'Habeas Corpus' Act, and the substitution of a militia for a standing army.

    The English Utilitarians, Volume I.

  • The French army of Flanders was gone, their artillery, their standards, their treasure, provisions, and ammunition were all left behind them: the poor devils had even fled without their soup-kettles, which are as much the palladia of the

    The History of Henry Esmond

  • The French army of Flanders was gone, their artillery, their standards, their treasure, provisions, and ammunition were all left behind them: the poor devils had even fled without their soup-kettles, which are as much the palladia of the French infantry as of the Grand Seignior's

    The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. A Colonel in the Service of Her Majesty Queen Anne

  • These, as palladia, had been assigned the first place in the carriage; and the deputies sat before them on the back-seat with becoming reverence.

    Autobiography: Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life

  • I had not been to the Old Country since 1912, and in a way I felt just like Robert Louis Stevenson's Scotchman, who was celebrated in his poem, "The Scotchman's Return from Abroad", which emphasizes two thingsthat his absence from home brought him in contact with things he did not at all approve of, and there were two things that he could never get to suit his taste when away from homer-whiskey and religion (laughter); neither of them was nearly strong enough for him (laughter) and his great delight in getting home was to renew his acquaintance with those two palladia of his dear native country.

    The Old Country Re-Visited

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