Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A genus of perennial herbs of eastern North America and Asia having aromatic tuberous roots: ginseng.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A genus of plants of the order Araliaceæ, type of the series Panaceæ, characterized by the two-celled ovary, pedicels jointed under the flower, usually panicled or racemed umbles, and obliquely decurrent stigmas.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. perennial herbs of eastern North America and Asia having aromatic tuberous roots: ginseng

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The Chinese were referring to panax ginseng, a variety grown in China.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • Indeed, the reverence in which some hold ginseng is reflected in its botanical name panax, which is derived from the Greek word for panacea.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • CAUTION: Some people may find panax ginseng too stimulating, especially if used before bedtime.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • In addition to panax, American ginseng or Panax quinquefolius see page 94 is very popular in China.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • Although it is very similar to panax ginseng, and offers many of the same benefits, Chinese herbalists believe that it is somewhat milder and perhaps less stimulating.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • * If used consistently, ginseng panax, American, or Siberian can help eliminate fatigue.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • In very rare cases, some people may develop headaches or high blood pressure from panax ginseng.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • Studies of Siberian ginseng by I. I. Brekhman show that, like members of the panax family, it can increase stamina.

    Earl Mindell’s New Herb Bible

  • You will typically find two non-Siberian forms of ginseng in health food stores: panax (Asian) and panax quinquefolium (American).

    The Source

  • At length arriving within a few hundred yards of the glacier, full of panax barbs, I found that both the glacier and its unfordable stream were pressing hard against a shelving cliff, dangerously steep, leaving no margin, and compelling me to scramble along its face before I could get on to the glacier.

    Travels in Alaska

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