Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Long underpants trimmed with ruffles extending below the skirt, worn by women in the mid-19th century. Often used in the plural.
  • n. A frill attached to the leg of underpants. Often used in the plural.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. One of the legs of the loose drawers formerly worn by children and women; especially the lower part of such a garment, coming below the knee, often made in a separate piece.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. One of the legs of the loose drawers worn by children and women; a pant leg; particularly, the lower part of such a garment, coming below the knee, often made in a separate piece; -- chiefly in the plural.

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

From pantaloon.

Examples

  • George Cruikshank called upon, for instance, to depict a lady fording a puddle on a rainy day, and were he averse (for he is the modestest of artists) to displaying too much of her ankle, he would assuredly make manifest, beneath her upraised skirts, some antediluvian pantalet, bordered by a pre-Adamite frill.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 87, January, 1865

  • Here, too, had passed cake receipts and pantalet patterns, bits of yeast-cake and preserving-kettles.

    In Simpkinsville : character tales,

  • My pantalet hung by a few threads, and as I wanted a rag to wash my earthens with, I tore it off.

    The English Orphans

  • The bottom of one pantalet was entirely torn off, and the other rolled nearly to the knee disclosing

    The English Orphans

  • a graceful shape in spite of the broad tucks in sleeve, skirt and pantalet, which kept it from draggling over her hands or on the floor,

    Old Caravan Days

  • "Oh, I don't know unless it's because he makes such nice popple whistles!" and as if the argument were conclusive, Jenny unrolled her pantalet, and tried to wipe some of the mud from her dress, at the same time glancing towards her sister, who at some little distance was reclining against an old oak tree, and poring intently over "Fairy

    The English Orphans

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