Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun The system, doctrines, and ceremonies of the Church of Rome; popery: usually a term of opprobrium.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun rare The doctrine and ceremonies of the Church of Rome; popery.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun derogatory The Roman Catholic faith.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

from papist

Examples

  • “Tillyvally for your papistry!” was answered from without;

    The Abbot

  • More shame that government send dragoons out after-a few honest fellows that bring the old women of England a drop of brandy, and let these ragamuffins smuggle in as much papistry and — Hark! — was that a whistle?

    Redgauntlet

  • Now, my lord, as a true Scottish man, and educated at the Mareschal – College of Aberdeen, I was bound to uphold the mass to be an act of blinded papistry and utter idolatry, whilk I was altogether unwilling to homologate by my presence.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • The revolution in papistry not happening in 1689, as Peter

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • If any one hated papistry Mrs. Bolton did so; but from a similar action of religious fanaticism she had fallen into worse that papistical self-persecution.

    John Caldigate

  • The answer had come, by way of George Wishart: it was Scotland who had abandoned God, led astray by the "puddle of papistry."

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • The answer had come, by way of George Wishart: it was Scotland who had abandoned God, led astray by the "puddle of papistry."

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • The reign of George the First, was a continual effort of the constitutional spirit against the remnants of papistry and tyranny, which still adhered to the government of England.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 61, No. 376, February, 1847

  • He dies, vowing vengeance upon Rome, and sending messages to Queen Elizabeth, "whom God hath bless'd for hating papistry."

    Bussy D'Ambois and The Revenge of Bussy D'Ambois

  • To be sure, the laws against recusants were not uniformly enforced; papistry in favourites and friends of the king was winked at, and the rich noblemen, who were able to pay fines, did not suffer much.

    English Travellers of the Renaissance

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