Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. paralysis.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • An OKW directive issued on 1 August stated that 'if it is decided not to carry out Sea Lion in September, all preparations will nevertheless be continued, but in a form which excludes serious damage to the economy through the paralysation of inland shipping'.

    Operation Sea Lion

  • It is because such as he force evil things upon their fellows — utter or imply them from the seat of authority or influence — to their agony, their paralysation, their unbelief, their indignation, their stumbling, that I have any right to speak.

    Unspoken Sermons Third Series

  • It is because such as he force evil things upon their fellows -- utter or imply them from the seat of authority or influence -- to their agony, their paralysation, their unbelief, their indignation, their stumbling, that I have any right to speak.

    Unspoken Sermons Series I., II., and II.

  • One of the possibilities to wrest the initiative of the unions and create an empty space in which the seeds of self-organisation may flourish seems to move towards the paralysation of a few economic infrastructures (communication, energy, transport) in a decentralised but well-considered way.

    Anarchist news dot org - Comments

  • Meanwhile, the country has to endure sacrifice in indefinite power cuts (with the exception of Greater Caracas, for the moment), improvised suspension schedules, irreparable damage to the electrical equipment and the paralysation of other services (health, education, telecommunications, etc) and human loss, all generated by the negligence of the state.

    Indymedia Ireland

  • The workers claim that N-hexane, a hazardous substance banned in most countries, which is being used to clean the LCD panels created by the company, lead to paralysation and death of several employees in 2009.

    Macworld

  • How shall we manage to combat that extremely subtle idea, which supposes it possible, through the use of a special artificial form, to effect by a small direct destruction of the enemy's forces a much greater destruction indirectly, or by means of small but extremely well-directed blows to produce such paralysation of the enemy's forces, such a command over the enemy's will, that this mode of proceeding is to be viewed as a great shortening of the road?

    On War — Volume 1

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