Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • His arms and armor were similar to the murmillos but the thraex carried a small shield parmula that made him lighter and more mobile.

    The Spartacus War

  • With his fifteen-pound scutum, a strong murmillo could hit harder, but a fast thraex could get in more blows in rapid succession with his seven-pound parmula.

    The Spartacus War

  • He held his shield close to his body to prevent the thraex from rapping at it with his parmula and destabilizing it.

    The Spartacus War

  • “Relicta non bene parmula,” says Mr. Jack the scholar.

    The Virginians

  • 'Philippos et celerem fugam sensi, relicta non bene parmula.'

    The Student's Companion to Latin Authors

  • But let us forget these "Tedeschi lurchi, non ragionam di lor;" and pass on to those manly virtues, which Tacitus records: To abandon your shield, is the basest of crimes, "relicta non bene parmula;" nor may a man thus disgraced be present at their sacred rites, nor enter their council; many, indeed, after escaping from battle, have ended their infamy with the halter.

    The Reign of Tiberius, Out of the First Six Annals of Tacitus; With His Account of Germany, and Life of Agricola

  • Did not Horace, doing the honours to himself, say that in war he one day let his shield fall (relicta non bene parmula)?

    Montaigne.

  • There are no tidings even of a misfortune such as that which happened to Horace when he went out to fight, and came home from the battle-field “relicta non bene parmula.”

    The Life of Cicero

  • _Tecum Philippos et celerem fugam Sensi relicta non bene parmula.

    The History of Roman Literature From the earliest period to the death of Marcus Aurelius

  • When Horace penned the playful allusion here made to having left his shield on the field of battle (_parmula non bene relicta_), he could never have thought that his commentators -- professed admirers, too -- would extract from it an admission of personal cowardice.

    Horace

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