Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of the genus Parnassia of herbaceous dicots.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the genus name.

Examples

  • The heather was in full blow, and in wet parts the ground white with parnassia.

    Lady John Russell

  • Its banks are embossed with moss and grass and sedge well mixed with flowers -- daisies, larkspurs, solidagos, parnassia, potentilla, strawberry, etc. Small strips of meadow occur here and there, and belts of slender arrowy fir and spruce with moss-clad roots grow close to the water's edge.

    Travels in Alaska

  • I saw a few plants anchored in the less crumbling parts of the steep-faced bosses and steps -- parnassia, potentilla, hedysarum, lutkea, etc. The lower, rough-looking patches half way up the mountain are mostly alder bushes ten or fifteen feet high.

    Travels in Alaska

  • Altogether these formed the most picturesque little nooks it was possible to conceive; and they exhibited the withered remains of so many kinds of primrose, gentian, anemone, potentilla, orchis, saxifrage, parnassia, campanula, and pedicularis, that in summer they must be perfect gardens of wild flowers.

    Himalayan Journals — Complete

  • The species are not identical, but closely analogous in aspect and physiognomy, as, marsh parnassia, and the prickly species of Ribes.

    COSMOS: A Sketch of the Physical Description of the Universe, Vol. 1

  • The vegetable passion of love is agreeably seen in the flower of the parnassia, in which the males alternately approach and recede from the female, and in the flower of nigella, or devil in the bush, in which the tall females bend down to their dwarf husbands.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • He often expanded his poetic rhapsodies on the sex life of plants with prose footnotes that also ascribe a wide range of intentionality and emotion to the plant kingdom: The vegetable passion of love is agreeably seen in the flower of the parnassia, in which the males alternately approach and recede from the female; and in the flower of nigella, or devil in the bush, in which the tall females bend down to their dwarf husbands.

    The Loves of Plants and Animals: Romantic Science and the Pleasures of Nature

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