Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Throughout a political party.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

party +‎ -wide

Examples

  • It seems, though, that there has not been a partywide effort necessarily to educate and help both lesser-seasoned candidates and also members to go out there and know how to say this, how to defend it, and how to be aggressive.

    Bleak House

  • So, then, you might think, what Obama should really be after is a partywide Manhattan Project.

    40 More Years

  • Gore's campaign doesn't have the feel of a band-of-brothers mission, but George W. Bush would be wise not to underestimate this franchise operation: a parliamentary-style campaign with a partywide agenda of proposals and the help of every power broker and personality in the book.

    Getting Serious

  • Photos Sen. McCain may have won enough states yesterday to carry him to the nomination, but he hasn't earned sufficiently large margins to claim a partywide mandate.

    When Will the Wounds Heal?

  • Yet President Bush's appearance will also work to soothe partywide tensions over his domestic agenda.

    The Oval: The Honeymoon Is Over

  • Their use of technology is much more innovative, and it's evidence of an Internet-friendly strategy partywide.

    The Daily Top Five: January 22, 2007

  • The DNC leadership post is a partywide elected position and Dean has the allegiance of the states, so this is nothing more than public masturbation.

    Hullabaloo

  • Haggerty got Bloomberg to give the state Independence Party $1.1 million for a partywide poll-watching initiative - then pocketed most of the dough, Assistant District Attorney Brian Weinberg told the court.

    NY Daily News

  • Prosecutors say Haggerty got the Democrat-turned-Republican-turned-independent mayor to give $1.1 million to the state Independence Party for a 2009 partywide poll-watching effort.

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • "Prom Night" because some Republicans and Democrats decided to break with tradition and sit side by side instead of in partywide blocs.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

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