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Etymologies

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Examples

  • As a helpful gallery placard explains, "passion" in this context derives from the Latin word passio, meaning "an intense suffering endured with self-control and tolerance."

    StarTribune.com rss feed

  • As a helpful gallery placard explains, "passion" in this context derives from the Latin word passio, meaning "an intense suffering endured with self-control and tolerance."

    StarTribune.com rss feed

  • In Latin, passio is “suffering,” flos means “flower” and the verb “to wander.”

    The Memory Palace

  • In Latin, passio is “suffering,” flos means “flower” and the verb “to wander.”

    The Memory Palace

  • But his tomb was venerated by the Christians of Rome, and he was afterwards recognized as a martyr, as the "passio" shows.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • The biography of Marcellinus in the "Liber Pontificalis", which probably alludes to a lost "passio" of his, relates that he was led to the sacrifice that he might scatter incense, which he did.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • The forger has made the most of the rumour of Marcellinus's lapse for his own purposes in a different way from the author of the "passio", which crept into the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • The lost "passio" of Marcellinus written towards the end of the fifth century, which was utilized by the author of the "Liber Pontificalis", shows that he was honoured as a martyr at that time; nevertheless his name appears first in the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 9: Laprade-Mass Liturgy

  • Passion is sinful (derived from "passio," suffering: implying that amidst seeming energy, a man is really passive, the slave of his anger, instead of ruling it). let not the sun go down upon your wrath -- "wrath" is absolutely forbidden; "anger" not so, though, like poison sometimes used as medicine, it is to be used with extreme caution.

    Commentary Critical and Explanatory on the Whole Bible

  • Bacon considered the ludicrous too intellectual to be called a "passio" or emotion.

    History of English Humour, Vol. 2 (of 2)

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