Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete form of pastor.
  • v. Obsolete spelling of pastor.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In the fine summer months the 'pastour', in his brown cape, and his black long-bearded ram lead hither flocks, whose flowing wool sweeps the turf.

    Cinq Mars — Complete

  • To the reuerend, learned, and vertuous, Master Hugh Branham minister of the Church of Harewich in England, his brother and felow pastour, &c.

    A briefe commentarie of Island, by Arngrimus Ionas

  • This man presently, in the time of bishop Augmund began in his youth to be enflamed with the loue of true pietie, & of the pure doctrine of the Gospel, & being pastour of the Church of

    A briefe commentarie of Island, by Arngrimus Ionas

  • God him self had becum pastour and governour unto thame: 2.

    The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6)

  • God becumis not onlye creator, bot also pastour and protectour, is more seveirlie intreated, then those nationis whair verray ignorance and contempt of God reigneth.

    The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6)

  • The sergeant being called before me, and accused, did deny his accusation, alleaging, if he were no pastour that had alleaged it, he would not lie under the injury.

    A Legend of Montrose

  • If it be objected, as it may justly be, that the mention of pastour is unsuitable, we must remember the mention of _grace_ and _cherubims_ in this play, and many such anachronisms in many others.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • The poet then goes on to ask, _Who dares to say this man_, this pastour, _is a flatterer_; the crime is universal; through all the world _the learned pate_, with allusion to the pastour, _ducks to the golden fool_.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • To illustrate this position, having already mentioned the case of a poor and rich brother, he remarks, that this preference is given to wealth by those whom it least becomes; _it is the_ pastour _that greases or_ flatters _the rich_ brother, and will grease him on till _want makes him leave_.

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

  • Church of Harewich in England, his brother and felow pastour, &c. I much marueiled (euen as you your selfe, reuerend sir coniectured that I would) at the first sight of your letters, that being a stranger I should be saluted in writing by one altogether vnknown vnto mee.

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 01

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