Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of peascod.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Pour out all in the name of Lucifer, fill here, you, fill and fill (peascods on you) till it be full.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • I go into the garden and gather a few peascods for seed till the horses should come up.

    Samuel Butler: a sketch

  • Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship, which grinds you stuff of any degree of fineness; but, nevertheless, what you get out depends on what you put in; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat-flour from peascods, so pages of formulæ will not get a definite result out of loose data.

    Lay Sermons, Addresses and Reviews

  • Marmaduke's ears recovered the shock of "Hot peascods, -- all hot!" than they were saluted with "Mackerel!"

    The Last of the Barons — Volume 02

  • Scarcely had Marmaduke's ears recovered the shock of "Hot peascods, -- all hot!" than they were saluted with

    The Last of the Barons — Complete

  • He crushed a few measures of peascods to cool his tusks; then turned his pleasurable longitudinal eyes far toward the outer extremities of their sockets, and leered fixedly and sarcastically at the high priests, showing every tooth in each jaw.

    Imaginary Conversations and Poems A Selection

  • Some had fruit like peascods, in each of which there were just ten small peas; I opened many of them, and found no more nor less.

    Early Australian Voyages: Pelsart, Tasman, Dampier

  • Some had fruit like peascods; in each of which there were just ten small peas; I opened many of them, and found no more nor less.

    A Voyage to New Holland

  • When the lost and prodigal son had riotously oon, sumed and wasted all his substance, insomuch that he was driven tp eat peascods with hogs, he begin - neth at the last tp call himself home, and earnestly to devise how he might be reconciled to his lather.

    The fathers of the English Church; or, A selection from the writings of the ...

  • Bentivegna nor any of his neighbours suspected aught; and the better to gain Mistress Belcolore's goodwill, he made her presents from time to time, sending her whiles a clove of garlic, which he had the finest of all the countryside in a garden he tilled with his own hands, and otherwhiles a punnet of peascods or a bunch of chives or scallions, and whenas he saw his opportunity, he would ogle her askance and cast

    The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio

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