Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as peel.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Zarká from her Utum, or peel-tower, saw the army three marches off and cried, O folk, either trees or

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The mighty peel-tower of Jock o 'the Park loomed up ahead, arrogantly sitting on a pasture at the confluence of the waters a spot known to both the Scots wardens and the English as the very cockpit of the Borders, where the writ of neither side ran.

    Mary Queen Of Scotland And The Isles

  • The Mamilian tower, to which the Suburans nailed the horse's head when they succeeded in carrying it off, appears to have been a peel-tower or keep of the old Mamilian family, the magnates of the village.

    The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion

  • The Mamilian tower, to which the Suburans nailed the horse’s head when they succeeded in carrying it off, appears to have been a peel-tower or keep of the old Mamilian family, the magnates of the village.

    Chapter 49. Ancient Deities of Vegetation as Animals. § 5. Virbius and the Horse

  • THE sun stared brazenly down on a gray farmhouse lying, long and low in the shadow of the Muir Pike; on the ruins of peel-tower and barmkyn, relics of the time of raids, it looked; on ranges of whitewashed outbuildings; on a goodly array of dark-thatched ricks.

    Bob, Son of Battle

  • This little peel-tower, with its tiny rooms, overlooked a county that is desolate enough now, but which then was finely wooded, and watered by the river

    Raleigh

  • Rossetti and Morris would shelter themselves securely, and even serenely, from the obloquy of criticism, within a slender peel-tower of the praise of friends.

    Some Diversions of a Man of Letters

  • He is of degree befitting a Stewart, and even were he not, oh, sisters, sisters, better to wed with a leal loving soul in ane high peel-tower than to bear a broken heart to a throne! 'and she fell into a convulsive fit of choked and bitter weeping, which terrified her sisters.

    Two Penniless Princesses

  • Zarká from her Utum, or peel-tower, saw the army three marches off and cried, "O folk, either trees or Himyar are coming upon you!" adding, in Rajaz verse: --

    Arabian nights. English

  • To know neither rest nor safety, to face danger every hour, to plough the field with arms piled carefully beside the furrow, to watch every figure that crossed the hillside in doubt whether it were foe or friend, to be roused from sleep by the slogan of the Highlander or the cry of the borderer as they swept sheep and kye from every homestead in the valley, to bear hunger and thirst and cold and nakedness, to cower within the peel-tower or lurk in the moorland while barn and byre went up in pitiless flame, to mount and ride at a lord's call on forays as pitiless, this was the rough school in which the

    History of the English People, Volume V (of 8) Puritan England, 1603-1660

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