Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Scanty wages.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I prescribed to her a course of reading; she had a little selection of English classics, a few of which had been left her by her mother, and the others she had purchased with her own penny-fee.

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • Then, laddie, ye wull hae earned yoursel 'th' penny-fee for whilk ye hae perilled your saul.

    Adrift in the Ice-Fields

  • Or deposite [11] her sair-won [12] penny-fee, [13]

    The Ontario Readers: The High School Reader, 1886

  • And if the lust of the penny-fee hath possessed him, 'tis but who can bid the highest, to have him fast body and soul.

    Unknown to History: a story of the captivity of Mary of Scotland

  • Whitsuntide came round without a penny-fee, the old blue-bottles of serving-men began to think of creeping elsewhere before the frost chilled them.

    Woodstock; or, the Cavalier

  • -- I'll get but little penny-fee, for his uncle, auld Nippie

    Old Mortality, Complete

  • "For the meat and lodging, Cuddie, I think I can promise something; but the penny-fee will be a hard chapter, I doubt."

    Old Mortality, Complete

  • I can promise something; but the penny-fee will be a hard chapter, I doubt.”

    Old Mortality

  • I’ll get but little penny-fee, for his uncle, auld Nippie Milnwood, has as close a grip as the deil himsell.

    Old Mortality

  • “They spoke of steps in the great gallery, heard by dead of the night, and voices that whispered at noon, in the matted chambers; and the servants pretended that these things scared them away; but, in my poor judgment, when Martinmas and Whitsuntide came round without a penny-fee, the old blue-bottles of serving-men began to think of creeping elsewhere before the frost chilled them. —

    Woodstock

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