Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Performing the act of perspiration; perspiratory.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Performing the act of perspiration; perspiratory.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This series of glands is of the most extensive use, as their excretory ducts open on the whole external skin forming its perspirative pores, and on the internal surfaces of every cavity of the body.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Sometimes the perspirative matter produced behind the ears becomes putrid from the want of daily washing them, and may also cause by its absorption the tumours of the lymphatics of the neck.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • And thus a fit of simple fever is produced, which is termed Febris irritativa; and consists of a torpor of the cutaneous capillaries with their mucous and perspirative glands, accompanied with a torpor of the heart and arteries; and afterwards of an increased action of all these vessels, by what is termed direct sympathy.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Externally the application of heat, as the warm bath, by its stimulus on the skin excites the excretory ducts of the perspirative glands, and the mouths of the lymphatics, which open on its surface, into greater action; and in consequence many other irritative motions, which are associated with them.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Then there succeeds a tingling, and heat, and sometimes sweat, owing to the increased action of the capillaries, or perspirative and mucous glands; which is occasioned by the accumulation of the sensorial power of association by the weaker action of the heart and arteries, which now increases the action of the capillaries.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • When a small part of the cutaneous capillaries with their mucous or perspirative glands are for a short time exposed to a colder medium, as when the hands are immersed in iced water for a minute, these capillary vessels and their glands become torpid or quiescent, owing to the eduction of the stimulus of heat.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • If a greater part of the cutaneous capillaries with their mucous and perspirative glands be exposed for a longer time to cold, the torpor or quiescence becomes extended by direct sympathy to the heart and arteries; which is known by the weakness, and consequent frequency of the pulse in cold fits of fever.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • The difficulty of injecting vegetable vessels seems to shew that their perspirative pores are much less than those of animals, and that the water which constitutes their perspiration is so divided at the time of its exclusion that by means of the sun's light it becomes decomposed, the inflammable air or hydrogene, which is one of its constituent parts, being retained to form the oil, resin, wax, honey,

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

  • Of the nine places inside this “dilly,” the four seats in the corners are so far preferable that the occupant has the outer side of his body exempt from a perspirative application of human flesh (the thermometer at 100 degrees of Fahrenheit), while, of the three middle places on the three seats, the man in the centre of the coach, with no support for his back, yet buried to the chin in men, women, and children, is at the ninth and lowest degree of human suffering.

    Fun-jottings, or, Laughs I have taken a pen to

  • These glands, as well as all the others, proceed from the capillary vessels, which unite the arteries with the veins, and are not properly a part of them; the mucous and perspirative glands, which arise from the cutaneous and pulmonary capillaries, are associated by direct sympathy; as appears from immersion in the cold bath, which is therefore attended with a temporary difficult respiration; while those from the capillaries of the stomach and heart and arteries are more generally associated by reverse sympathy with those of the cutaneous capillaries; as appears in fevers with weak pulse and indigestion, and at the same time with a hot and dry skin.

    Zoonomia, Vol. II Or, the Laws of Organic Life

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