Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • As implied by the word petrefaction, most palæontological remains have been transformed into stone, but leaves and bones completely incrusted in limestone, and therefore petrified, have been found which belong to the present geological era and are, therefore, not considered fossils, whereas the skeletons of the mammoth and rhinoceros frozen in the ice of Siberia, or the insects preserved in amber are.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 11: New Mexico-Philip

  • If I have not already made clear my former sensations of the petrefaction of hand and brain, I despair of being able to do so any better now.

    Widdershins

  • He is firmly convinced that no very out-of-the-way effort by the Allies is needed to score a big point in the War Game and that our hold-up here is not a reality but only a hold-up or petrefaction of the brains of the

    Gallipoli Diary, Volume 2

  • From the time that Clara had thrown aside her veil and began to speak to him he had stood staring and staring – his consternation growing and growing – until it had seemed to have turned him into stone – from which state of petrefaction he did not recover until he saw the stage coach roll rapidly away, carrying off – whom?

    The Hidden Hand

  • She considered the silent system cruel, and especially adapted to harden the heart of a criminal even to moral petrefaction.

    Elizabeth Fry

  • From the time that Clara had thrown aside her veil and began to speak to him he had stood staring and staring -- his consternation growing and growing -- until it had seemed to have turned him into stone -- from which state of petrefaction he did not recover until he saw the stage coach roll rapidly away, carrying off -- whom?

    Capitola's Peril A Sequel to 'The Hidden Hand'

  • A Gothic cathedral is the petrefaction of our religion.

    Literary Remains, Volume 1

  • But he is cold, "added she:" he is a piece of obstinate petrefaction, which Heaven itself could not melt! "

    Thaddeus of Warsaw

  • To my enquiries after this wonderful petrefaction, he replied, "That it might be bought for a thousand pounds;" and added, "that if he were a _Ricco

    Observations and Reflections Made in the Course of a Journey through France, Italy, and Germany, Vol. I

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