Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. See lapwing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative form of peewit.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The lapwing.
  • n. The European black-headed, or laughing, gull (Xema ridibundus). See under laughing.
  • n. The pewee.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A name of various birds.
  • n. and gull.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. small olive-colored woodland flycatchers of eastern North America
  • n. large crested Old World plover having wattles and spurs
  • n. small black-headed European gull

Etymologies

Imitative of its call.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • As I came near them, some of them kept flying round and round just over my head, and crying "pewit" so distinctly one might almost fancy they spoke.

    Types of Children's Literature

  • As I came near them, some of them kept flying round and round, just over my head, and crying "pewit," so distinctly one might almost fancy they spoke.

    The Confederate First Reader: Containing Selections in Prose and Poetry as Reading Exercises for the Younger Children in the Schools and Families of the Confederate States.

  • For surely Pan was there, where the curlew cried and the pewit mourned, and sometimes the waiting soldiers must almost have imagined his mocking laughter borne in the winds that swept across the bleak hills of their exiled solitude.

    A Book of Myths

  • What a pleasure it is to throw ourselves down beneath the verdant screen of the beautiful fern, or the shade of a venerable oak, in such a scene, and listen to the summer sounds of bees, grasshoppers, and ten thousand other insects, mingled with the more remote and solitary cries of the pewit and the curlew!

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 10, No. 262, July 7, 1827

  • Hinpoha listened to his disgruntled "pewit phoebe, pewit phoebe," and made haste to throw him some crumbs.

    The Camp Fire Girls at School Or, The Wohelo Weavers

  • It is unmistakably spring, because the pewit bushes are budding and on yonder aspen we can hear a forsythia bursting into song.

    Mince Pie

  • Now and then I caught the cry of a pewit, or saw a snipe glance up from his bed; but mainly I was busied about the mare.

    The Splendid Spur

  • It spanned the stormy Atlantic and the cold North Sea and set me down in sight of the little village of straw-thatched farm-houses where I played in the long ago, right by the dam in the lazy brook where buttercups and forget-me-nots nodded ever over the pool, and the pewit built its nest in spring.

    When I went Home to Mother

  • ┬ö Hence stork and swallow are the friends of man, while the pewit dwells in exile, fleeing ever from his presence with its lonesome cry.

    When I went Home to Mother

  • The leaves made a lonely sound as they rustled over her head, and when at last she saw a black object moving about among the trees at some distance beyond the rock-pile, it is not surprising that she immediately gave the pewit call, loud and clear.

    The Scotch Twins

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