Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Peyote.

Etymologies

From Nahuatl peyotl. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • According to Klüver the word “peyote” also refers to these hairs and is derived from peyotl, meaning cocoon in Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs.

    One River

  • The Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún, who first wrote of the plant in 1560, noted that peyotl was common food of the Chichimeca, for it sustains them and gives them courage to fight and not feel fear nor hunger nor thirst.

    One River

  • But it makes you feel so bad afterwards. the mescal does, and you're sick with the peyotl; besides it always made that awful feeling of being ashamed much worse the next day.

    Brave New World

  • The return to civilization was for her the return to soma, was the possibility of lying in bed and taking holiday after holiday, without ever having to come back to a headache or a fit of vomiting, without ever being made to feel as you always felt after peyotl, as though you'd done something so shamefully anti-social that you could never hold up your head again.

    Brave New World

  • Of the two plants mentioned, the _ololiuhqui_ and the _peyotl_, the former was considered the more potent in spiritual virtues.

    Nagualism A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History

  • Not the least important item is that of their use of the intoxicant, _peyotl_, a decoction of which it appears played a prominent part in their ceremonies.

    Nagualism A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History

  • The _peyotl_ was not the only herb prized as a means of casting the soul into the condition of hypostatic union with divinity.

    Nagualism A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History

  • _ I have loved God with all my heart; but sometimes I have believed in dreams, and also I have believed in the sacred herbs, the _peyotl_, and the _ololiuhqui_; and in other such things

    Nagualism A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History

  • _peyotl_, or hast thou given it to others to drink, in order to find out secrets, or to discover where stolen or lost articles were?

    Nagualism A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History

  • Slipper through the multicolored hallucinations of peyotl and tri-narcotine, to the sexual fantasies induced by nace and morphine, and at last to the memory-resurrecting dreams of the carmoid group. "

    The Status Civilization

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