Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of phantasy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The transmutation of material facts by celestial phantasies is to some extent within the power of humanity, even the imperfect humanity of to-day.

    Married Love: or, Love in Marriage

  • Nor is it as useful as Freud deems it for resolving the conflicts that stem from childhood phantasies.

    Article Abstracts

  • They at once inform such phantasies and are the only means through which they are (not) known.

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

  • Victor's consciousness is bent on denying this creature to the degree that it keeps manifesting the wish that animates his phantasies: annihilating women and family, loosening by tightening the ties that bind.

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

  • Both authors look to early childhood for their answers, both underscore the determining role of childhood phantasies on the adult writer's choice of content, and both point to the temporal dynamism and shape-shifting capacities of phantasy, by which "past, present, and future are strung together, as it were, on the thread of the wish that runs through" the phantasies ( "Creative" 148).

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

  • Frankenstein, where Shelley names her creature and book "hideous progeny" by way of accounting for their origins in her phantasies as a child - and adult, to which I will return.

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

  • One advantage for Freud is that creative writing restores pleasure to the revelation of adult phantasies, otherwise kept a secretive and intensely private domain, owing to the allegedly shameful nature

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

  • It is as if Shelley here addresses to the phantasies inspired by literature the question that Freud applies to dreams: "must one assume responsibility for the content of one's dreams?"

    Notes on 'Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality'

  • Frankenstein does not depict these phantasies as belonging only to Victor, but instead as stemming from medieval literature (at once, antiquated and alchemical) and as inhering in a class of men — prometheans — the strength of whose egos and thus of whose ego's defenses leave it to literature to voice what must remain unconscious in them.

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

  • It shows how the phantasy nature of day-dreams, deemed similar to the semi-conscious state of the fiction-writer, can interact with unconscious phantasies from infancy.

    Attached to Reading: Mary Shelley's Psychical Reality

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