Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Obsolete form of philosophic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • What philosophick heroism was it in him to appear with such manly fortitude to the world while he was inwardly so distressed!

    The Life of Samuel Johnson LL.D.

  • Pope may have had from Bolingbroke the philosophick stamina of his Essay; and admitting this to be true, Lord Bathurst did not intentionally falsify.

    Life of Johnson

  • His Vanity of Human Wishes has less of common life, but more of a philosophick dignity than his London.

    Life Of Johnson

  • What philosophick heroism was it in him to appear with such manly fortitude to the world, while he was inwardly so distressed!

    Life Of Johnson

  • Nor was his energy confin'd alone To friends around his philosophick throne; Its influence wide improv'd our letter'd isle.

    Life Of Johnson

  • He was lying in philosophick tranquillity with a greyhound of Col's at his back, keeping him warm.

    Life of Johnson

  • Some ingenious persons of a philosophick turn have assured us that our pulpits were set too high, and that the soporifick tendency increased with the ratio of the angle in which the hearer's eye was constrained to seek the preacher.

    The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell

  • His _Vanity of Human Wishes_ has less of common life, but more of a philosophick dignity than his _London_.

    Life of Johnson, Volume 1 1709-1765

  • Pope may have had from Bolingbroke the philosophick _stamina_ of his Essay; and admitting this to be true, Lord Bathurst did not intentionally falsify.

    Life of Johnson, Volume 3 1776-1780

  • The philosophick goddess of Boethius, having related the story of Orpheus, who, when he had recovered his wife from the dominions of death, lost her again by looking back upon her in the confines of light, concludes with a very elegant and forcible application.

    The Rambler, sections 171-208 (1751-1752); The Adventurer, sections 34-108 (1753); from The Works of Samuel Johnson, in Sixteen Volumes, Volume IV

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