Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any pigment that is unstable in the presence of light; used especially of the chromophore pigments in the rod cells and cone cells of the eye

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a special pigment found in the rods and cones of the retina

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Invertebrates have rhabodomeric cells that use a special version of the photopigment called r-opsin, and activate cells by a particular pathway called a phospholipase-C cascade.

    PZ Myers - The Deepest Links (on Evolution)

  • The ability to see the world as humans do, he says, ‘requires an additional sensor—or photopigment—and the nervous system being able to compare the signals.’

    Three Color Blind Mice: See How They See : Edward Champion’s Reluctant Habits

  • For example, he would claim that a photopigment without any linkers or down stream signalling molecules would be useless, and unselectable by natural selection.

    Blind Mice vs Behe; the Evolution of Vision - The Panda's Thumb

  • In order for humans to see infrared, the spectral sensitivity of some human photopigment would have to be changed.

    Mind Hacks: August 2005 Archives

  • Vision scientists knew that retinal, the derivative of vitamin A, was part of every photopigment molecule and that various forms of vitamin A existed.

    Mind Hacks: August 2005 Archives

  • These 'nonvisual' light responses have been suggested to be predominantly mediated by the novel photopigment melanopsin Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) belongs to the vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)/glucagons/secretin family and plays pleiotropic roles as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator and neurotrophic factor

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • The photopigment melanopsin has been suggested to act as a dominant photoreceptor in nonvisual photoreception including resetting of the circadian clock (entrainment), direct tuning or masking of vital status (activity, sleep/wake cycles, etc.), and the pupillary light reflex (PLR).

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Japan The photopigment melanopsin has been suggested to act as a dominant photoreceptor in nonvisual photoreception including resetting of the circadian clock (entrainment), direct tuning or masking of vital status (activity, sleep/wake cycles, etc.), and the pupillary light reflex

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • Douglas RH, Foster RG (2001) Characterization of an ocular photopigment capable of driving pupillary constriction in mice.

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • As discussed above, electrophysiological measurements may only indirectly reflect underlying photopigment absorbance spectra, but we also note that there can be deviations from predicted spectra even when based on isolated photoreceptor photocurrents: for example recordings from amphibian cones have revealed narrower than predicted spectra

    PLoS ONE Alerts: New Articles

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