Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A flattened leafstalk that functions as a leaf, as in an acacia.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A flattened petiole or leaf rachis that resembles and functions as a leaf, and may or may not be combined with an actual lamina.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Same as phyllodium.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Same as phyllodium.
  • n. In some echinoids, one of the leaf-shaped areas into which the ambulacra are expanded.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an expanded petiole taking on the function of a leaf blade

Etymologies

New Latin phyllōdium, from Greek phullōdēs, leaflike : phullon, leaf; see phyllo- + -ōdēs, adj. suff.; see collodion.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Latin phyllodium, Greek phullodes - resembling a leaf (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • In trials where rainfall is relatively high, the Charleville, Queensland provenance, a broad phyllode form, has grown more rapidly than provenances from central Australia (Ryan and Bell 1989).

    Chapter 10

  • Its form and phyllode morphology are exceptionally variable (Midgley and Gunn 1985).

    Chapter 10

  • Trees with different phyllode forms have been observed to have different growth rates (Fox 1980).

    Chapter 10

  • FODDER: The fodder potential is mainly due to the large phyllode biomass produced during the dry season, a period when most non-Australian acacias traditionally used for fodder shed their leaves.

    Chapter 10

  • Seedlings are able to switch back from phyllode to true leave production when the sunlight reaching them is reduced.

    Chapter 8

  • A. holosericea is perhaps the most frequently planted Australian Acacia in development projects because of its superior yield and because it retains a large phyllode biomass during the dry season, while African species shed their leaves during this period (Cossalter, 1986).

    Chapter 2

  • The phyllode has the ability to photosynthesize and for all practical purposes, it is the equivalent of a leaf.

    Chapter 2

  • There are 3 prominent longitudinal nerves running together towards the lower margin or in the middle near the base, with many fine crowded secondary nerves, and a distinct gland at the base of the phyllode (Pedley 1978).

    Chapter 41

  • Seedlings are able to switch back from phyllode to true leave production when the sunlight reaching them is reduced (Walters and Bartholomew 1990).

    Chapter 2

  • In trials where rainfall is relatively high, the Charleville, Queensland provenance a broad phyllode form, has grown more rapidly than provenances from central Australia (Ryan and Bell 1989).

    Chapter 50

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