Definitions

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  • adj. Pertaining to physicalism.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • One of the main motivations behind the perceptual/representational views of pain in philosophy is the belief (or hope) that perception as a species of information gathering can be accounted for entirely in physicalistic terms.

    Pain

  • Another problem with physicalistic views along the lines of Mill's is that they seem incapable of accounting for the sheer size of the infinities involved in set theory.

    Platonism in Metaphysics

  • But in fact, there are infinitely many different kinds of set-theoretic structures, and platonists can argue that physicalistic views like Maddy's are incompatible with this.

    Platonism in Metaphysics

  • Thirdly, he writes that his ideas were the same as Avenarius who had approached questions of the relationship between the psychical and the physical from a physicalistic perspective.

    Ernst Mach

  • The “inverted” and “absent” qualia objections were initially presented as challenges exclusively to functionalist theories, both conceptual and empirical, and not generally to physicalistic theories of experiential states; the main concern was that the purely relational resources of functional description were incapable of capturing the intrinsic qualitative character of states such as feeling pain, or seeing red.

    Functionalism

  • There are numerous problems with physicalistic views of mathematics.

    Fictionalism in the Philosophy of Mathematics

  • Most current work in the philosophy of mind presupposes physicalism, and it is generally agreed that a physicalistic theory that does not simply deny the reality of the mental (that is not an “eliminativist” theory), raises metaphysical questions.

    Metaphysics

  • Flohr's approach is physicalistic and reductionistic, but it is entirely independent of any specific quantum ideas.

    Quantum Approaches to Consciousness

  • All along Carnap (1932e, 1961a) merely conceded that it was more “convenient” to reconstruct the language of science on a physicalistic basis.

    Vienna Circle

  • Page 548, Volume 3 basis for reconstruction (already briefly discussed as one of several possible alternatives in the Aufbau): the language that would provide for the “unity of science” in this sense was to be the (“physicalistic”) intersubjec - tive observation language.

    Dictionary of the History of Ideas

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