Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pitch-dark; dark as pitch.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It was aye pit-mirk; the flame o 'th can'le, when he set it on the grund, brunt steedy an clear as in a room; naething moved, but the Dule water seepin' and sabbin 'doon the glen, an' yon unhaly footstep that cam 'ploddin' doun the stairs inside the manse.

    Masterpieces of Mystery, Vol. 1 (of 4) Ghost Stories

  • "Neither moon nor star, sir, and pit-mirk," 3.2 said I. "I cannae see the bed."

    Kidnapped: The Adventures of David Balfour

  • It was aye pit-mirk; the flame o 'the can'le, when he set it on the grund, brunt steedy and clear as in a room; naething moved, but the Dule Water seepin' and sabbin 'doon the glen, an' yon unhaly footstep that cam 'plodding' doun the stairs inside the manse.

    Stories by English Authors: Scotland (Selected by Scribners)

  • It was aye pit-mirk; the flame o 'the can'le, when he set it on the grund, brunt steedy and clear as in a room; naething moved, but the Dule water seepin' and sabbin 'doon the glen, an' yon unhaly footstep that cam 'ploddin doun the stairs inside the manse.

    Merry Men

  • "Neither moon nor star, sir, and pit-mirk," * said I. "I cannae see the bed."

    Kidnapped

  • But now if ye will, hearken my rede: it is now well-nigh dark, and in two hours or somewhat more it will be pit-mirk, and these men outside the walls will be going to their rest with no watch and ward set outward toward the upland.

    The Sundering Flood

  • “But the brood-hen,” remonstrated Mysie — “ou, she’s sitting some gate aneath the dais in the hall, and I am feared to gae in in the dark for the dogle; and if I didna see the bogle, I could as ill see the hen, for it’s pit-mirk, and there’s no another light in the house, save that very blessed lamp whilk the Master has in his ain hand.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

  • "But the brood-hen," remonstrated Mysie -- "ou, she's sitting some gate aneath the dais in the hall, and I am feared to gae in in the dark for the dogle; and if I didna see the bogle, I could as ill see the hen, for it's pit-mirk, and there's no another light in the house, save that very blessed lamp whilk the Master has in his ain hand.

    The Bride of Lammermoor

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