Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun One who seeks persistently for public office.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • It argued a fastidious sensitiveness of conscience, and a nice sense of political propriety so opposed to the sordid selfishness and unblushing tergiversation of the ordinary place-hunter as to be almost offensive. '

    The Grand Old Man

  • A place-hunter hastened to his old acquaintance, Lincoln, when he was seated, of course, to secure a trough.

    The Lincoln Story Book

  • It argued a fastidious sensitiveness of conscience, and a nice sense of political propriety so opposed to the sordid selfishness and unblushing tergiversation of the ordinary place-hunter as to be almost offensive. '

    The Grand Old Man

  • It mattered not that they had approved Weed's management in the past, their fight now proposed to end the one-man power, and every place-hunter who could not secure patronage under Lincoln's administration if Evarts went to the Senate, ranged himself against

    A Political History of the State of New York, Volumes 1-3

  • "Not a bit of it; a philosopher would have passed these two worthless sugar canes just as a place-hunter passes an overthrown minister, that is, as unworthy of notice."

    Willis the Pilot

  • He exposes the miser, the seducer of innocence, the self-seeker, the place-hunter, the degraded vendor of moral poison, the 'charitable' hypocrite, with the same fierce moral energy as that with which, when but a lad of one and twenty, he first assailed the vices of the society in which his own lot was cast.

    Henry Fielding: a Memoir

  • Then and since, every Irishman who accepts the office so vehemently demanded is suspected of a good understanding with Englishmen, and soon becomes reviled as a traitor and place-hunter.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 08, No. 47, September, 1861

  • If fanatics sometimes "prophesied" out of the fullness of excited brains, or fervid souls, no place-hunter adopted the pulpit as a profession.

    Elizabeth Fry

  • To the few -- for they are few -- who thrive by deeds of darkness whenever the Union is attacked, these signs of coming change suggest a more tragic interpretation, from which the fanatic and the place-hunter would recoil -- when too late.

    Against Home Rule (1912) The Case for the Union

  • There could not have been any selfish ambition in this; no place-hunter would have attempted to bear the heavy burden Kerensky then assumed, especially with his knowledge of the seriousness of the situation.

    Bolshevism The Enemy of Political and Industrial Democracy

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