Definitions

Sorry, no definitions found. Check out and contribute to the discussion of this word!

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The plainiffs emphasize its similarity to marketable tissues, but there are certainly similarities to non-marketable ones.

    The Volokh Conspiracy » Jeff Rowes Guest-Blogging This Week on the Bone Marrow Compensation Case

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • No court has ruled on the merits, only standing, and to get that far they needed to pass the "frivolity test", meaning that while the plainiffs had no standing, the issue had merit.

    Yahoo! News: Business - Opinion

  • Also, as a practical matter, smart plainiffs’ attorneys who have a clear claim of intentional injury will often plead a claim of accidental injury in order to get insurance coverage — they will “plead into coverage.”

    The Volokh Conspiracy » “How a Dentist Assaulted a Patient and Made a Million Dollars”:

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.