Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Archaic form of plastid.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Organs are as essential for locomotion in a plastide particle as in a mastodon or megatherium, and if the microscope could only give back the proper response, we should see them, if not be filled with wonder at the marvellous perfection of their structure.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • His morphological cells, as well as plastide particles, are among these living organisms, as is conclusively shown by his own experiments.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • It accounts for the appearance of every form of life in organic infusions; for _Bacteria_ in the blood, _Torulæ_ in the tissues, plastide particles, morphological cells, and every other vital manifestation, from the smallest conceivable

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • If Mr. Herbert Spencer will descend from his stilted theory of "molecular machinery worked by molecular force," and tell us what it all means; and, at the same time, turn us out a single plastide particle, or fungus spore, by any generating process referable to "the machinery" in question, we will as devoutly worship Matter and Motion as ever ancient Egyptian did the god Osiris.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • In speaking of his "plastide particles," Professor Bastian, the most defiant challenger of vitalistic propositions now living, says:

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • For all these membranous tissues are innumerably thronged with bioplasts or plastide particles, not for the purposes of obedience to man's will, or of performing any autonomous function, but simply to supply the tissues with the necessary nutrient matter to make up for the constant waste that is going on in a healthy living organ.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • But in every living organism, from the lowest and simplest to the highest and most complex, all bioplastic spinners of filamentous tissue, all plastide weavers of membranous or spun matter, all epithelial bobbin-runners, and other anatomical helpers and workers, perform their respective tasks under the special supervision we have named, that is, under the higher unit of life.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • "_molecules organiques_," "plastide particles," or "highly differentiated life-stuff," insisted upon by the physicists, in their materialistic theories of life.

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • The whole controversy, as at present conducted by the materialists and vitalists, resolves itself into this one question: -- Whether life springs from what Dr. Harvey calls a "primordium," -- a pre-existing vital germ or unit -- or whether it originates _de novo_, as the materialists assert, from infusions contained in their experimental flasks, or from plastide particles contained in protoplasmic matter, or from the still more daring hypothesis of "molecular machinery" as worked by molecular force?

    Life: Its True Genesis

  • "primordia viventium" plastide particles, bioplasts, vital units, or whatsoever we will, -- the name is nothing, the working process is everything.

    Life: Its True Genesis

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