Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of playact.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They practiced this fantasy for hours at a time, as Kakfa playacted waiting tables, all the while laughing together.

    Rodger Kamenetz: Kafka Manuscripts: The Fight Over Kafka

  • They practiced this fantasy for hours at a time, as Kakfa playacted waiting tables, all the while laughing together.

    Rodger Kamenetz: Kafka Manuscripts: The Fight Over Kafka

  • (It is a perception that applies to changes taking place throughout the culture at the very moment, in the mid-1960s, when he was looking at those bricks — whether in Capote and Mailer's attempts to break down differences between fiction and reporting, or in Godard's movies, where we all became self-conscious watching films that felt like essays as much as narratives and seemed more playacted than acted.)

    An Eye on the Tremors

  • For 18 months, he pinched cheeks, bowled with oranges in the aisles of his campaign plane, and playacted flight attendant.

    Going After Gore

  • Had she playacted her affections for him for all that time, in order to put her hands on the greater prize?

    Forbidden Enchantment

  • Here I was masquerading as a teacher, just as I'd playacted being an altar boy, or a civil servant, or a student.

    Broken Music, A Memoir

  • It was a transparent charade for both of them: one they'd both playacted before, during previous crises.

    The Sinister Six Combo

  • Singapore armed forces playacted at subduing a cabal of "terrorists" who had shot a half dozen flower-bearing children in red leotards, leaving them "dead" on the stage.

    SARA - Southeast Asian RSS Aggregator

  • Singapore armed forces playacted at subduing a cabal of "terrorists" who had shot a half dozen flower-bearing children in red leotards, leaving them "dead" on the stage.

    SARA - Southeast Asian RSS Aggregator

  • (It is a perception that applies to changes taking place throughout the culture at the very moment, in the mid-1960s, when he was looking at those bricks-whether in Capote and Mailer's attempts to break down differences between fiction and reporting, or in Godard's movies, where we all became self-conscious watching films that felt like essays as much as narratives and seemed more playacted than acted.)

    The New York Review of Books

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