Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of pleasance.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • English country-houses and their pleasances is a possible thing; and nowhere are they more abundant than within an hour's walk of our present locality.

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 17, No. 097, January, 1876

  • It is adopted, however, though modified, by M. Rénan.] [Footnote 32: According to Ewald, the ivory tower in this poem was raised in one of these beautiful "pleasances," in the Anti-Libanus, looking toward Hamath.] [Footnote 33: Ewald: _Geschichte_, iii., pp. 62-68; a very remarkable and valuable passage.]

    The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 01

  • So he examined it and found it of the rarest of pleasances, full of all manner paintings in gold and lapis lazuli.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • All around were lakes, meadows, great trees and walled pleasances of infinite fertility, and I wandered around it all as though I had been magicked myself.

    Magicked in a Market Town

  • When evening drew near, I opened the door of the first chamber and found myself in a place like one of the pleasances of Paradise.

    The Fortieth Door

  • Now at length, this fully done, and the service of the goddess perfected, they came to the happy place, the green pleasances and blissful seats of the Fortunate Woodlands.

    The Aeneid of Virgil

  • But with the 'Sixties there began to emerge a critical disposition to look beyond the trim pleasances of the Early Victorians to more daring romantic adventure in search of the truth that lies in beauty, and more fearless grip of the beauty that lies in truth.

    Robert Browning

  • Browning's “idyls” are studies in life's moments of stress and strain, not in its secluded pleasances and verdurous wooded ways.

    Robert Browning

  • While American troops were threading the mountain passes and the morasses of the Philippines, scaling the walls of Pekin, and sunning themselves in the delectable pleasances of the Forbidden City, and while

    The Path of Empire; a chronicle of the United States as a world power

  • But those initiated knew well that behind the solemn barrier there smiled a kind of earthly paradise -- pleasances where even the flowerful soil of Sicily seemed extravagantly prolific of color, extravagantly prodigal of odors; thickets wherein the great god

    The Proud Prince

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