Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of plenty.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Peace, dear nurse of arts, plenties, and joyful birth.

    Pearls of Thought

  • Why? because the doctrines he preached to them were directly contrary to their lusts and corrupt affections, and defeated their expectations of a worldly Messias, who should have answered their sensual desires with the plenties and glories of such an earthly kingdom, as they had wholly set their gross hearts and souls upon.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. II.

  • A third ground or motive of envy is from the wealth, riches, or plenties of another.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. IV.

  • No, the hypocrite's hope and joy is quite of another make and mould. he finds no taste or relish in celestial joys, abstracted from the plenties and jollities of the world.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. VI.

  • And in such a case envy will be sure to work and boil up to a more than ordinary height, while the envious person frets, and raves, and swells at the plenties and affluence of his abounding neighbour, and (as I may so express it) is even ready to burst with another's fulness.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. IV.

  • All its designs and efficacy terminate on this side heaven, nor does policy so much as pretend to any more than to be the great art of raising a man to the plenties, glories, and grandeurs of the world.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. I.

  • He never sends the pleasures of the spring nor the plenties of harvest to surfeit, but to oblige the sons of men; and the very fruits of the earth are intended as arguments to carry their thoughts to heaven.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. III.

  • Thirdly and lastly, Has God thought fit to cast thy lot amongst the poor of this world, and that either by denying thee any share of the plenties of this life, which is something grievous; or by taking them away, which is much more so?

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. II.

  • It has been observed in the earlier ages of the church, that none lived such healthful and long lives, as monks and hermits, who had sequestered themselves from the pleasures and plenties of the world, to a constant ascetic course, of the severest abstinence and devotion.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. I.

  • If an horse grows resty, head strong, and apt to throw his rider, surely to pamper him cannot be the way to tame him; but the discipline of the whip and spur will bring him to hand much sooner and surer than the plenties of the rack and manger.

    Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions. Vol. IV.

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