Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of ploughboy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The first is that – by accident or design – the translators chose to evoke the very ploughboys for whom Tyndale made his vernacular Bible, a very different audience from the metropolitan Anglicans to whom their version was directed.

    The King James Bible reconsidered | David Edgar

  • Seriously, though, it always used to bug me when books did NOT live up to their covers: all those Frazetta Flesh and Thew Fests wrapped around drab little tales of angsty ploughboys.

    Covers Gone Crazy

  • And Chloe's own erotic exhilaration knows no bounds: glowing with anticipation, she breaks into song to celebrate her future marriage, which she sings "will be fun," a sentiment her chorus of ploughboys echoes with the refrain, "be fun, be fun, be fun,/And that to me will be fun" (173).

    'Pleasure is now, and ought to be, your business': Stealing Sexuality in Jane Austen's _Juvenilia_

  • They have turned the theatre back into a chapel again: they have six little ploughboys dressed in surplices to sing the service; and

    The Newcomes

  • While Frank Gresham was thus misbehaving himself, and going on as though to him belonged the privilege of falling in love with pretty faces, as it does to ploughboys and other ordinary people, his great interests were not forgotten by those guardian saints who were so anxious to shower down on his head all manner of temporal blessings.

    Doctor Thorne

  • But nothing now could rob her of the power of boasting that she had consorted on the lawn with the squire and Miss Thorne, with a countess, a bishop, and the county grandees, while Mrs. Greenacre and such-like were walking about with the ploughboys in the park.

    Barchester Towers

  • But that did me no good for it was other pretty ploughboys he enjoyed.

    The Unlaid Maid

  • Come, all you jolly ploughboys, and help me to sing;

    The Jolly Plowboy (2)

  • Class amusements, be they for dukes or ploughboys, always become nuisances and curses to a country.

    Tom Brown's Schooldays

  • He had heard other ploughboys with rapture recount scenes of rustic jollity, which had fallen in their way, while out on nocturnal visits to the fair daughters or servant girls of the neighbouring farmers -- scenes of which he was practically ignorant.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 17, No. 475, February 5, 1831

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.