Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Alternative spelling of plower.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And when he ended his verses, he wept with sore weeping, for indeed the ways were walled up before his face and death seemed to him better than dreeing life, and he walked on like a drunken man for stress of distraction, and stayed not till noontide, when he came to a little town and saw a plougher hard by, ploughing with a yoke of bulls.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Imperial Rome: he had not learnt to love the arts of peace and he cultivated none but those of war; he was by choice a warrior and a sailor, a wanderer to other lands, a plougher of the desolate places of the "vasty deep," yet withal a lover of home, who trod at times, with bitter longing for his native land, the thorny paths of exile.

    Hero-Myths & Legends of the British Race

  • We have referred to the Bull many times, both in his astronomical aspect as pioneer of the Spring-Sun, and in his more direct rôle as plougher of the fields, and provider of food from his own body.

    Pagan and Christian Creeds: Their Origin and Meaning

  • I'm beginning to feel already rather as if a plougher had ploughed upon my back and made large furrows; but of course I'm thinking principally of Frank on account of his sprained ankle.

    Priscilla's Spies

  • Suppose that the plougher, or dweller-on, is an Englishman: he owes rent to the English.

    The Lord of the Sea

  • The site is the field's chief good: so the plougher owes something to those who, making it good, own it, This something is named "rent".

    The Lord of the Sea

  • Seasons pursuing each other, the plougher ploughs, the mower mows, and the winter-grain falls in the ground;

    Walt Whitman

  • We have referred to the Bull many times, both in his astronomical aspect as pioneer of the Spring-Sun, and in his more direct role as plougher of the fields, and provider of food from his own body.

    Pagan and Christian creeds: their origin and meaning

  • That the sleep shall be for the plougher, and the loaf for him that sowed,

    The Influence of Old Norse Literature on English Literature

  • The reaper with his hook, the plougher with his oxen, the girl who gleans amongst the trailing vines, the child that sees the flowers tossing with the corn, the men that sing to get a blessing on the grapes -- they have all a certain grace and dignity of the old classic ways left with them.

    Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida Selected from the Works of Ouida

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