Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of ploughland.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Will your oxen of their own accord yoke themselves for the deep ploughlands and draw the earth-cleaving share through the fallow, and forthwith, as the year comes round, reap the harvest?

    The Argonautica

  • It was sadly run down from its former value, its ploughlands shrunken, no place to expect to find, grazing in the tenant's paddock, a tall bay thoroughbred fit for a prince to ride.

    The Devil's Novice

  • It was sadly run down from its former value, its ploughlands shrunken, no place to expect to find, grazing in the tenant's paddock, a tall bay thoroughbred fit for a prince to ride.

    The Devil's Novice

  • Will your oxen of their own accord yoke themselves for the deep ploughlands and draw the earth-cleaving share through the fallow, and forthwith, as the year comes round, reap the harvest?

    The Argonautica

  • The abbot durst no other, there he unhooded his brother, and the child gave the abbot in hand twenty ploughlands, and afterwards they proceeded forth into London.

    Roman de Brut. English

  • And ploughlands on the far-off hills that glow with friendly brown.

    Spirits in bondage; a cycle of lyrics

  • Steep wooded banks rising out of the water's edge give the windings of the estuary the feeling of solemn mystery which is not obtainable from meadows or ploughlands.

    What to See in England

  • The colours of shadows vary with climate and season; they are mauve on ripe corn, deeply black on hot, white roads in summer, purple on ploughlands in sandstone country, silver-grey on snow.

    The Spring of Joy: A Little Book of Healing

  • In the ploughlands on either side the plovers gravely go through their one trick every year, tempting the pursuer from their nest with mock fear and inward satisfaction.

    The Spring of Joy: A Little Book of Healing

  • Once more, as in early spring, the air is full of wings, missel thrushes, fieldfares and redpolls are busy in the ploughlands, great gatherings of starlings assemble in the afternoon to go to roost in the reeds; when thousands of them rise together, there is a sound like the unfurling of a silken banner.

    The Spring of Joy: A Little Book of Healing

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