Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Any grass of the genus Erianthus, the name alluding to the very showy feathery panicles of several species; woolly beard-grass. For the ornamental E. Ravennæ, see Erianthus. E. saccharoides, of the southern United States, also deserves culture for decorative purposes. E. alopecuroides, found from New Jersey to Texas on the coast plain, is the spiral-awned or fox-tail plume-grass.

Etymologies

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Examples

  • Timothy head and clover-bloom, oxeye and feathery plume-grass, they had bowed and swayed and shivered till the commotion, very conspicuous to one looking down upon the tranquil, flowery sea of green, caught the attention of the marsh-hawk, which at that moment chanced to be perching on a high fence stake.

    The Watchers of the Trails A Book of Animal Life

  • But we heard nothing except the wind in the plume-grass.

    Soldier Stories

  • A large, low moon turned the tops of the plume-grass to silver, and the stunted camelthorn bushes and sour tamarisks into the likenesses of trooping devils.

    Soldier Stories

  • But we heard nothing except the wind in the plume-grass.

    Indian Tales

  • A large, low moon turned the tops of the plume-grass to silver, and the stunted camel-thorn bushes and sour tamarisks into the likenesses of trooping devils.

    Indian Tales

  • A large, low moon turned the tops of the plume-grass to silver, and the stunted camelthorn bushes and sour tamarisks into the likenesses of trooping devils.

    Life's Handicap

  • The soil of the steppe, on which grows the nutritious plume-grass requisite for the food of the kumys mares, is very fertile, and immense crops of rye, wheat, buckwheat, oats, and so forth are raised whenever the rainfall is not too meagre.

    Russian Rambles

  • The steppe is no longer an unbroken expanse of waving plume-grass and flowers, wherein riders and horses are lost to sight as, in Gogol's celebrated tale, were Taras Bulba and his sons, fresh from the famous Academy of Kieff, which lies at our feet, below the cliffs.

    Russian Rambles

  • The fourth article in the creed is that mares grazing on the rich plume-grass of the steppe produce milk which is particularly rich in sugar, very poor in fat, and similar to woman's milk in its proportion of albumen, though better furnished: all which facts combine to give kumys whose chemical proportions differ greatly from those of kumys prepared elsewhere.

    Russian Rambles

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