Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of pneumonia.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • This aspiration of applesauce or puréed squash into his respiratory system causes recurrent pneumonias, so he is often not fed by mouth at all.

    Between Expectations

  • This aspiration of applesauce or puréed squash into his respiratory system causes recurrent pneumonias, so he is often not fed by mouth at all.

    Between Expectations

  • Altogether, there had been 153 deaths; epidemiologists thought that seemed high, though they had no data to prove it.19 Out of the forty, only nine provided information about which bacteria caused the fatal pneumonias.

    SUPERBUG

  • Patients had minor skin infections, huge gaping wounds, grave infestations of bone and muscle, and critical pneumonias that got them whisked immediately to the ICU.

    SUPERBUG

  • The medical complications of the STAMP regimen had, of course, been predictably ghastly: near-lethal infections, severe anemia, pneumonias, and hemorrhages in the heart.

    The Emperor of All Maladies

  • Three children—a sixteen-year-old, a twenty-two-month-old, and a twenty-month-old—had died of pneumonias specifically caused by MRSA, something the CDC had never seen before in flu.18

    SUPERBUG

  • In an ordinary flu season, bacterial pneumonias—particularly those caused by staph—were rarely expected.

    SUPERBUG

  • But during the next season—the winter of 2006 and spring of 2007—states began besieging the CDC with reports of severe pneumonias in children that were demonstrably caused by staph.

    SUPERBUG

  • Bolstered by a flu shot, the immune system recognizes the virus and mounts a defense against it, making flu cases less likely and reducing the likelihood that deadly bacterial pneumonias will occur.

    SUPERBUG

  • They confirmed what earlier pathologists had not had the technology to prove: a large proportion of deaths in the 1918 pandemic—which killed up to 100 million—were due to severe pneumonias caused by common bacteria including staph.14 The bacteria normally lived elsewhere on the body, or high in the nose and throat, but were able to slip deep into the lungs because flu infection had destroyed the protective mechanisms that kept pathogens at bay.15

    SUPERBUG

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