Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • adjective Poetic.
  • adjective Fancifully depicted or embellished; idealized.

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Same as poetic.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • adjective of or pertaining to poetry, suitable for poetry, or for writing poetry.
  • adjective expressed in metrical form; exhibiting the imaginative or the rhythmical quality of poetry.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adjective characteristic of or befitting poetry
  • adjective of or relating to poetry

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • But in striking contrast to Shakespere and to others, Middleton has no kind of poetical morality in the sense in which the term poetical justice is better known.

    A History of Elizabethan Literature

  • But the term poetical does not appear very applicable to the generality of Dutch painting; and a little reflection will show us, that if the Italians represent only the invariable, they cannot be properly compared even to historians.

    Selections From the Works of John Ruskin

  • "Never mind; we can make believe that the queen has sent them off, so as not to scare Pocahontas; that's what they call poetical license," said Polly.

    Half a Dozen Girls

  • But I can't help seeing there's a kind of -- what they call poetical justice in it, the blow coming from him.

    The Second Latchkey

  • "No! take it easy," said Robinson; "he is a poet; this is what they call poetical license."

    It Is Never Too Late to Mend

  • We are indeed so much used to what they call poetical justice, that we are disappointed in the catastrophe of a fable, if everybody concerned in it be not disposed of according to the sentence of that judge which we have set up in our own breasts.

    Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph

  • Poets have formed what they call a poetical system of things, which though it be believed neither by themselves nor readers, is commonly esteemed a sufficient foundation for any fiction.

    A Treatise of Human Nature

  • Poets have formed what they call a poetical system of things, which though it be believed neither by themselves nor readers, is commonly esteemed a sufficient foundation for any fiction.

    A Treatise of Human Nature

  • Poets have form'd what they call a poetical system of things, which tho 'it be believ'd neither by themselves nor readers, is commonly esteem'd a sufficient foundation for any fiction.

    A treatise of human nature

  • Among the moderns, indeed, there has arisen a chimerical method of disposing the fortune of the persons represented, according to what they call poetical justice; and letting none be unhappy but those who deserve it.

    Isaac Bickerstaff, physician and astrologer

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