Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of poeticism.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Such poets replaced the "poeticisms" of their elders with a stark, emotional directness.

    Palestine Blogs aggregator

  • Hammerstein's tendency towards thin characterisation, philosophical naivety and self-conscious poeticisms don't meet his pupil's exacting standards.

    Finishing the Hat: The Collected Lyrics of Stephen Sondheim by Stephen Sondheim – review

  • Mr. Burgess's narrator hero, Alex, was pungently odious; addicted to mugging and rape, intoxicated with his own command of the language (a newly minted teen-age slang, plus poeticisms, sneers, and sadistic purring), Alex was something both better and worse than a murderer: he was murderous.

    Horror Show

  • This poetry is also musically astute and demanding; it may surprise and alert the parental reader; and it has its share of archaisms and poeticisms, which, contrary to adult surmise, bemuse and fascinate children.

    Songs of Childhood

  • Last time it was internet-speak poeticisms and now his upcoming co-star, Anthony Mackie, has served up get i...

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Last time it was internet-speak poeticisms and now his upcoming co-star, Anthony Mackie, has served up get i...

    The Full Feed from HuffingtonPost.com

  • Gale's text is given to such poeticisms as "I will live in the winter of my life" that might have taken wing had there been a good score attached.

    chicagotribune.com - News

  • Since then, I have been getting by on increasingly desperate alliteration and empty poeticisms.

    An Unreliable Witness

  • Even a very early lyric, like "How sweet I roam'd from field to field", supposedly written before Blake's 14th year, and which at first sight appears to echo the most threadbare poeticisms of the time "And Phoebus fir'd my vocal rage" means little more than "The sunshine made me want to sing"--even this apparently most insipid and conventional verse has a moral darkness and complexity of thought that we recognise as truly Blakeian, however young he was when he wrote it:

    News at Eleven: But it isn't banal.

  • Even a very early lyric, like "How sweet I roam'd from field to field", supposedly written before Blake's 14th year, and which at first sight appears to echo the most threadbare poeticisms of the time "And Phoebus fir'd my vocal rage" means little more than "The sunshine made me want to sing"--even this apparently most insipid and conventional verse has a moral darkness and complexity of thought that we recognise as truly Blakeian, however young he was when he wrote it:

    Archive 2010-02-01

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