Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun An act or process of creation.

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

from Ancient Greek ποίησις (poiesis), from ποιέω (poieo, "to make")

Examples

  • In the film, technology leads us to the discovery that it is within ourselves, not outside of us, that the solution to the problem of technology – a solution Heidegger called poiesis, or pure creativity – is hiding.

    enowning

  • In the film, technology leads us to the discovery that it is within ourselves, not outside of us, that the solution to the problem of technology – a solution Heidegger called poiesis, or pure creativity – is hiding.

    Archive 2008-10-01

  • For the sake of brevity, I will focus on the evolving relationship of "poiesis" to physis in Heidegger's work as an indication that nature's "presence" or truth may not ultimately require human artifice to be revealed.

    Blake, Heidegger, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology: A Fourfold Perspective on Humanity's Relationship to Nature

  • In his essay “The Question Concerning Technology,” Heidegger summons the Ancient Greek origin of techne to describe technology as methods and skills, but a means for getting at true forms and ideas, the “bringing-forth,” from the Greek poiesis.

    Alex Pasternack: How to Read Facebook

  • In his essay “The Question Concerning Technology, ” Heidegger summons the Ancient Greek origin of techne to describe technology as methods and skills, but a means for getting at true forms and ideas, the “bringing-forth, ” from the Greek poiesis.

    Alex Pasternack: How to Read Facebook

  • Against this the authors recommend an approach they call "meta-poiesis," a kind of restraint drawing on disciplined skill, artistry and reverence for the natural world.

    The Gods Return

  • In his essay “The Question Concerning Technology,” Heidegger summons the Ancient Greek origin of techne to describe technology as methods and skills, but a means for getting at true forms and ideas, the “bringing-forth,” from the Greek poiesis.

    Alex Pasternack: How to Read Facebook

  • In his essay “The Question Concerning Technology,” Heidegger summons the Ancient Greek origin of techne to describe technology as methods and skills, but a means for getting at true forms and ideas, the “bringing-forth,” from the Greek poiesis.

    Alex Pasternack: How to Read Facebook

  • Such gatherings constitute the thingness of things, something not only true of the products of human poiesis, but also of the physis of natural entities:

    Blake, Heidegger, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology: A Fourfold Perspective on Humanity's Relationship to Nature

  • Rather than pitting technology's poiesis against earth's physis in an effort to alter the latter, Heidegger suggests that technology should ideally allow the earth's own presence to "be" instead of transforming nature into a gigantic "standing reserve" (17) of energy.

    Blake, Heidegger, Buddhism, and Deep Ecology: A Fourfold Perspective on Humanity's Relationship to Nature

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