Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun A title of several officials in ancient Greek states.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English.

  • noun (Gr. Antiq.) In Athens, originally, the military commanderin-chief; but, afterward, a civil magistrate who had jurisdiction in respect of strangers and sojourners. In other Grecian cities, a high military and civil officer.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun historical, Ancient Greece, originally The military commander in chief in Athens.
  • noun historical, Ancient Greece A civil magistrate in Athens who had jurisdiction in respect of strangers and sojourners.
  • noun historical, Ancient Greece In other Greek cities, a high military and civil officer.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Perhaps Callimachus, the acting polemarch, would have had a different story to tell -- but he died in the fighting, leaving Miltiades to shape post-battle narrative.

    Asher Smith: 2,500 Years Later, Political Lessons From Marathon

  • Perhaps Callimachus, the acting polemarch, would have had a different story to tell -- but he died in the fighting, leaving Miltiades to shape post-battle narrative.

    Asher Smith: 2,500 Years Later, Political Lessons From Marathon

  • Perhaps Callimachus, the acting polemarch, would have had a different story to tell -- but he died in the fighting, leaving Miltiades to shape post-battle narrative.

    Asher Smith: 2,500 Years Later, Political Lessons From Marathon

  • These they fell foul of, and the senior polemarch was just on the point of closing with them “breast to breast” when some one, it is said, shouted, “Let their front ranks pass.”

    Hellenica

  • It was then that Gylis the polemarch met his end, as also Pelles, who was on his personal staff, and the whole of the Spartans present without exception — eighteen or thereabouts — perished, either crushed by stones or succumbing to other wounds.

    Hellenica

  • Phoebidas the Lacedaemonians despatched a polemarch with a division by sea to form the garrison of Thespiae.

    Hellenica

  • Then the polemarch ordered the ten-years-service men329 to charge and drive off their assailants.

    Hellenica

  • Arrived at a point within three miles or so325 of Sicyon, the polemarch turned back himself in the direction of Lechaeum with his heavy infantry regiment, six hundred strong, giving orders to the cavalry commandant to escort the Amyclaeans with his division as far as they required, and then to turn and overtake him.

    Hellenica

  • These attacks told so severely that the polemarch a second time gave the order (and this time for the fifteen-years-service men) to charge.

    Hellenica

  • He, holding to his former theory with regard to the invasion, even before sacrificing the customary frontier sacrifice, sent a despatch to the polemarch at Thespiae, with orders to seize the pass which commands the road over

    Hellenica

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