Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun citizenship

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Ancient Greek πολιτεία (politeia, "city, state, system of government")

Examples

  • I am a UKIP member, but I can't answer the question as I don't have the faintest inkling what a 'politeia' is.

    [mass surveillance] challenge to the uklp and ukip

  • Nam Catonem nostrum non tu amas plus quam ego; sed tamen ille optimo animo utens et summa fide nocet interdum rei publicae; dicit enim tamquam in Platonis politeia, non tamquam in Romuli faece, sententiam.

    CONSPIRATA

  • Can you outline for the readers, or point them to, any succinct, definitive articles which show: 1. How the politeia of this country can be so altered other than by protesting in vain that the surveillance process described below can be stopped in its tracks?

    [mass surveillance] challenge to the uklp and ukip

  • Can you outline for the readers, or point them to, any succinct, definitive articles which show: 1. How the politeia of this country can be so altered other than by protesting in vain that the surveillance process described below can be stopped in its tracks?

    Archive 2009-06-01

  • The poet “awakens this part of the soul and nourishes it,” producing a disordered psychic regime or constitution (politeia, 605b7-8; compare this language to that of the passages at the end of book IX of the Republic).

    Plato on Rhetoric and Poetry

  • The politeia, the citizenship of the Church is to do – like other kinds of citizenship – with how people take responsibility for the management of power, how they cooperate, how they become responsible to each other.

    Archbishop's Holy Week Lecture: Faith & Politics

  • The early Church saw itself as a body of citizens: you'll find the language in the New Testament, famously in Paul's letter to the Philippians: 'your citizenship is in heaven' says Paul, using the Greek word politeia.

    Archbishop's Holy Week Lecture: Faith & Politics

  • One of the main things about ancient Greece was the emergence of the city-states, the Athenian politeia being one of them.

    The recovery of virtue

  • So Christian identity is irreducibly political in the sense that it defines a politeia, a kind of citizenship (Philippians 3.20); yet its existence and integrity are not bound to a successful realisation of this citizenship within history.

    Rome Lecture: 'Secularism, Faith and Freedom'

  • So Christian identity is irreducibly political in the sense that it defines a politeia, a kind of citizenship (Philippians 3.20); yet its existence and integrity are not bound to a successful realisation of this citizenship within history.

    Rome Lecture: 'Secularism, Faith and Freedom'

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