Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Simple past tense and past participle of polka.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I polkaed some with Uncle David, which made me feel lonely, that and watching all the lovers kiss at midnight.

    Deadly

  • I polkaed some with Uncle David, which made me feel lonely, that and watching all the lovers kiss at midnight.

    Deadly

  • I polkaed some with Uncle David, which made me feel lonely, that and watching all the lovers kiss at midnight.

    Deadly

  • I polkaed some with Uncle David, which made me feel lonely, that and watching all the lovers kiss at midnight.

    Deadly

  • I polkaed some with Uncle David, which made me feel lonely, that and watching all the lovers kiss at midnight.

    Deadly

  • I attended private parties in sumptuous evening dress, simpered and aired my graces like a born beau, and polkaed and schottisched with a step peculiar to myself—and the kangaroo.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • I attended private parties in sumptuous evening dress, simpered and aired my graces like a born beau, and polkaed and schottisched with a step peculiar to myself—and the kangaroo.

    LIGHTING OUT FOR THE TERRITORY

  • The older ones square-danced in the middle of the hall and we younger ones waltzed and polkaed in a long line down the outside ring.

    Land of the Burnt Thigh

  • They waltzed, schottisched, polkaed and danced until everybody was tired and drunk.

    Country life in Georgia in the days of my youth,

  • The vulgar always knew what General danced with the lovely Miss A., and how they looked, and what they said to each other; how many jewels Miss A. wore, and the material her dress was made of; they knew who polkaed with the accomplished Miss B., and how like a duchess she bore herself; they had the exact name of the colonel who dashed along so like a knight with the graceful and much-admired Mrs. D., whose husband was abroad serving his country; what gallant captain of dragoons (captains of infantry were looked upon as not what they might be) promenaded so imperiously with the vivacious Miss E.; and what distinguished foreigner sat all night in the corner holding a suspicious and very improper conversation with Miss

    An Outcast or, Virtue and Faith

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