Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of pollard.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They were also stacked against the trunks of pollards.

    Wildwood

  • Left alone to grow naturally, an ash will live no more than 200 years, but pollards as much as 500 years old rise like grey, lichened dolmens in the hedges of Cumbria.

    Wildwood

  • On the land Islands between Denmark and Finland, Helen found some 7,000 ash and elm pollards, all between one and two hundred years old, still being harvested for their browse wood.

    Wildwood

  • Along our local lanes, ash pollards stand as monuments to centuries of woodmanship.

    Wildwood

  • Two hundred yards from here a dozen pollards rise from the common in a double row like ham-bones, their knuckles a kind of battleground, swollen like boxing gloves.

    Wildwood

  • Each of the ash pollards on our green is a world of its own, tenanted, like the common, by a great variety of individuals, each intent on a particular form of sustenance.

    Wildwood

  • Wherever she found them, she studied the techniques of their culture and harvesting, and, as in the case of the Basque pollards in the steep woods of Aiako Harria and the Fort de Sare, recorded the vocabulary of the craft.

    Wildwood

  • Almost within sight of the bower, on the common beyond the moat and along the green lanes, are dozens of ancient ash pollards.

    Wildwood

  • It is fissured like a rock, over two yards in girth, and hollow, as old pollards usually are.

    Wildwood

  • The remains of several old elm pollards are still gently decaying in my hedges, but new trees are rising again from the roots.

    Wildwood

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