Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. happening at different times
  • adj. Able to schedule multiple tasks contemporaneously

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Some cultures mix both styles, such as the Japanese, who are monochronic when it comes to work, and polychronic in social situations.

    One At A Time?

  • The United States and Canada tend to be fairly monochronic, while Mexico tends to be polychronic.

    One At A Time?

  • Efficient polychronic people (including many Mexicans) can quickly become extremely valuable to the company, because what they do would take more than one person.

    One At A Time?

  • On the opposite end, there are polychronic cultures, in which people tend to do various tasks simultaneously.

    One At A Time?

  • The weakness of the polychronic style is that if not well managed, it can simply create chaos.

    One At A Time?

  • Often, polychronic people will accept any request for additional work, and sometimes they are overly optimistic as to how much can be accomplished.

    One At A Time?

  • A polychronic person can more easily adapt to jobs such as interpreters (listening in one language while speaking in another), or as a receptionist who acts as telephone operator and secretary simultaneously.

    One At A Time?

  • On the other hand, polychronic people, if they manage their style correctly, can be more productive since they use their time to work on more than one task.

    One At A Time?

  • This creates a "ceiling effect" for many efficient polychronic people, who, while being appreciated in their companies, see their efficiency as a block to a quicker promotion.

    One At A Time?

  • I dunno, but you might want to look into polychronic vs. monochronic time management.

    Ask MetaFilter

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