Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • noun Plural form of pomade.
  • verb Third-person singular simple present indicative form of pomade.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Avoid the use of products such as pomades and perfumed hair ointment that could promote the growth of fungi.

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  • Mr. Knoll always picks pomades or waxes that have "medium texture," he says.

    A Man's Unruly Yet Polished Hair

  • Recently, he stunned the readers of his blog by announcing he'd switched pomades.

    Boing Boing

  • He was at least sixty years old, but had no doubt been stooped and graying for years, all jewelry and combed beard and slick pomades and colognesa dandy gone nightmarishly wrong in his declining years.

    Virginity

  • So high was the hair piled in these portraits that wire frames are thought to have been used as a kind of scaffolding around which to mould the locks.60 Dyes and pomades were used to add tint, sheen, and hold, the effect of which is now lost to us since ancient marble portraits long ago were stripped of paint that might have given an idea of the colors used.

    Caesars’ Wives

  •   But in the midst of his metamorphosis, all of the pomades, instructions and appointments, the gel had long ago been abandoned and the umbrella today, of all days, had been left at Chusma's.

    LYES

  • But in the midst of his metamorphosis, all of the pomades, instructions and appointments, the gel had long ago been abandoned and the umbrella today, of all days, had been left at Chusma's.

    LYES

  • They were bastinadoed on their stomachs without injury, and placed before a large fire; but, being defended by certain pomades and preparations, were not burned.

    A Philosophical Dictionary

  • Let my lord use no perfumes which come not from well accredited persons; no unguents — no pomades.

    Kenilworth

  • Dame Ursley maintained her intercourse with this superior rank of customers, partly by driving a small trade in perfumes, essences, pomades, head-gears from France, dishes or ornaments from China, then already beginning to be fashionable; not to mention drugs of various descriptions, chiefly for the use of the ladies, and partly by other services, more or less connected with the esoteric branches of her profession heretofore alluded to.

    The Fortunes of Nigel

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