Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of poniard.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Bruce poniarding the Red Comyn in the Church of the Dominicans at this place, and becoming a king and patriot because he had been a church-breaker and a murderer.

    Redgauntlet

  • Harb were celebrated for shooting or poniarding the man who ventured to use to them even the mild epithet “O jackass!”

    Personal Narrative of a Pilgrimage to Al-Madinah and Meccah

  • Marat repelled the disparaging imputation of clemency and common sense, and talked in his familiar vein of poniarding brigands, burning despots alive in their palaces, and impaling the traitors of the Assembly on their own benches.

    Critical Miscellanies (Vol. 1 of 3) Essay 1: Robespierre

  • Again, at Warrenton, in the hospital, she came near poniarding me with her own hand.

    Mohun, or, the Last Days of Lee

  • I have met with men in this quarter of the city, coarse, violent, sometimes ferocious, but really _men_; nice as to their honour, to the extent of poniarding any one who is wanting in respect to them.

    The Roman Question

  • Neither will I take the traveller's privilege of inflicting upon you the whole history of Bruce poniarding the Red Comyn in the Church of the Dominicans at this place, and becoming a king and patriot because he had been a church-breaker and a murderer.

    Redgauntlet

  • His white bear, and not he, seems to have had the chief merit of despatching six surely rather incompetent hunters who followed the rash "Kennybol": and of his two final achievements, that of poniarding two men in a court of justice might have been brought about by anybody who was careless enough of his own life, and that of setting his gaol on fire by any one who, with the same carelessness, had a corrupt gaoler to supply him with the means.

    A History of the French Novel, Vol. 2 To the Close of the 19th Century

  • Immediately afterwards, these two convulsionists attacked one another with daggers, as with the fury of two maniacs, who, having resolved on mutual destruction, were solely bent each on poniarding the other. "[

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 77, March, 1864

  • By the cross which is my protection, "he cried," if they wish to try their poniarding, they shall have an opportunity! "

    The Strong Arm

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