Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • noun Milit., the carriages or wagons and materials carried with an army to construct bridges.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In 1846, General Taylor reported, that, after the victories of Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma, a pontoon-train would have enabled him to cross the Rio Grande "on the evening of the battle," take Matamoras "with all the artillery and stores of the enemy and a great number of prisoners, -- in short, to destroy entirely the Mexican army."

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 12, No. 74, December, 1863

  • The singular blunder by which General Thomas's pontoon-train was sent toward

    Forty-Six Years in the Army

  • The chief engineer, Major Duane, will furnish you a canvas pontoon-train of eight boats.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • It so happened that General Davis's route into Savannah followed what was known as the "River-road," and he had to make constant use of his pontoon-train -- the head of his column reaching some deep, impassable creek before the rear was fairly over another.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Aldershot, England, a very complete pontoon-train; the boats were sheathed with wood and felt, made very light; but I think these were more liable to chafing and damage in rough handling than were our less expensive and rougher boats.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Captain O.M. Poe, chief-engineer, will assign to each wing of the army a pontoon-train, fully equipped and organized; and the commanders thereof will see to their being properly protected at all times.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • For the passage of rivers, each army corps had a pontoon-train with

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Ocmulgee at Planters 'Factory, which they crossed, by the aid of the pontoon-train, during the 18th and 19th of November.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • Generally the single pontoon-train could provide for nine hundred feet of bridge, which sufficed; but when the rivers were very wide two such trains would be brought together, or the single train was supplemented by a trestle-bridge, or bridges made on crib-work, out of timber found near the place.

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

  • By uniting two such sections together, we could make a bridge of eighteen hundred feet, enough for any river we had to traverse; but habitually the leading brigade would, out of the abundant timber, improvise a bridge before the pontoon-train could come up, unless in the cases of rivers of considerable magnitude, such as the Ocmulgee, Oconee,

    Memoirs of the Union's Three Great Civil War Generals

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