Definitions

from The Century Dictionary.

  • Covered with or containing poplars.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • I was feeling stronger and was glumly planning a move to Paris when I saw an automobile speed up the poplared walk toward

    The Firefly of France

  • If it had been a nice, worldly-looking, well-kept chateau, with poplared walks and a formal garden, I should have welcomed it with open arms; but it wasn't, decidedly!

    The Firefly of France

  • Rotary, -- riding along straight poplared roads, through well-ordered forests and over wild hills, between vineyards, one year under the grey skies of Flanders or among the lagoons of Picardy and another under the brilliant sunshine of Provence or through the rich pastures of the sweet

    Nights Rome, Venice, in the Aesthetic Eighties; London, Paris, in the Fighting Nineties

  • It is vastly different to awake in Gretz, to go down the green inn-garden, to find the river streaming through the bridge, and to see the dawn begin across the poplared level.

    Across the Plains: With Other Memories and Essays

  • Such beds as we were going to sleep in, and all the while the rain raining on homeless folk over all the poplared country-side.

    The Life of Robert Louis Stevenson for Boys and Girls

  • - and all the while the rain raining on houseless folk over all the poplared countryside!

    An Inland Voyage

  • -- and all the while the rain raining on houseless folk over all the poplared countryside!

    The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 1 (of 25)

  • -- and all the while the rain raining on houseless folk over all the poplared countryside!

    An Inland Voyage

  • Catulus owned the adjoining property, and Hortensius also had a house not far away, but such was the hostility between Cicero and the aristocrats that, despite the long summer days he spent reading and writing in his villa’s cool and poplared glades, they never once invited him to dine.

    Imperium

  • Catulus owned the adjoining property, and Hortensius also had a house not far away, but such was the hostility between Cicero and the aristocrats that, despite the long summer days he spent reading and writing in his villa’s cool and poplared glades, they never once invited him to dine.

    Imperium

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