Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • verb Present participle of porpoise.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • They are shown travelling in schools, porpoising from the waves, and smoothly powering themselves beneath the surface with their forked, shark-like tails.

    Archive 2006-09-01

  • They are shown travelling in schools, porpoising from the waves, and smoothly powering themselves beneath the surface with their forked, shark-like tails.

    Did ichthyosaurs fly? Probably not, no

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

  • This is commonly referred to as "porpoising" - think of how a porpoise or dolphin comes up just below the surface and then rolls just beneath, only breaking the surface with their dorsal fin or tail.

    Aspen Times - Top Stories

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