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Examples

  • Is it from tropic stars, apertio portarum, in the dodecotemories or constellations, the moon's mansions, such aspects of planets, such winds, or dissolving air, or thick air, which causeth this and the like differences of heat and cold?

    Anatomy of Melancholy

  • Samson asportauit nocte fores portarum: deinde in Cæsaream

    The Voyages and Travels of Sir John Mandeville

  • Samson asportauit nocte fores portarum: deinde in C鎠aream

    The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation

  • Quoniam confortavit seras portarum tuarum: benedixit fili is tuis in te.

    The St. Gregory Hymnal and Catholic Choir Book

  • Sed Hiempsal in oppido Thirmida forte ejus domo utebatur, qui proximus lictor [70] Jugurthae carus acceptusque ei semper fuerat; quem ille casu ministrum oblatum promissis onerat impellitque, uti tamquam suam visens domum eat, portarum claves adulterinas [71] paret

    C. Sallusti Crispi De Bello Catilinario Et Jugurthino

  • Its blood vessels that compose it as a gland, are the branches of the vena portarum, which, as I mentioned in the last lecture, enters the liver and distributes its blood like an artery.

    Popular Lectures on Zoonomia Or The Laws of Animal Life, in Health and Disease

  • In the vessels of the liver there is no intervention of the heart; but the vena portarum, which does the office of an artery, is distended by the blood poured into it from the mesenteric veins, and is by this distention stimulated to contract itself, and propel the blood to the mouths of the numerous glands, which compose that viscus.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Thus the mesenteric veins absorb the blood from the intestines by glandular appetency, and carry it forward to the vena portarum; which acting as an artery contracts itself by disagreeable stimulus, and pushes it to its ramified extremities, the various glands, which constitute the liver.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • It sometimes happens that the large external veins of the legs burst, and effuse their blood; but this occurs most frequently in the veins of the intestines, as the vena portarum is liable to suffer from a schirrus of the liver opposing the progression of the blood, which is absorbed from the intestines.

    Zoonomia, Vol. I Or, the Laws of Organic Life

  • Thus the vegetable circulation, complete in the lungs, but probably in the other part of the system deficient in respect to a system of returning veins, is carried forwards without a heart, like the circulation through the livers of animals where the blood brought from the intestines and mesentery by one vein is dispersed through the liver by the vena portarum, which assumes the office of an artery.

    The Botanic Garden A Poem in Two Parts. Part 1: the Economy of Vegetation

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