Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a woman poseur

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Arina Stassinopoulos Huffington IS a flake, a poseuse AND an attention-seeking diva.

    West Wing actors blow John McCain's cover

  • Yes, I am a privileged poseur (poseuse?) because my parents steeped me in music from well before day 1 and I learned three instruments (good at piano, so-so at fiddle, only ever scared cat with oboe).

    You look away for 2 minutes and...

  • Why should she accept such a favor at the hands of this poseuse?

    The Nest Builder

  • The author, E.M. DELAFIELD, has made an almost uncannily penetrating study of the development of a _poseuse_.

    Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 152, March 14, 1917

  • How often the woman or man with a God-given sense of the beautiful, the fitting, harmony between costume and setting, is described as poseur or poseuse by those who lack the same instinct.

    Woman as Decoration

  • It was such a simple matter nowadays to have them removed that obviously only a poseuse would tolerate them.

    Tutors' Lane

  • At this moment Margot was inclined to be classic, caught by a plastic poseuse from Athens, who, attired solely in gold-leaf, was giving exhibitions at the Hippodrome to the despair of Mrs. Grundy.

    The Way of Ambition

  • The actors are necessarily a little frigid, the hero, unwillingly perhaps, a poseur, the heroine willingly a poseuse; but the scenery in which they carry about their rarefied and cool personalities is very attractive.

    The Novels of Mrs. Wharton

  • Unconsciously -- without perceiving it -- one may be half a _poseuse_; but at least I've been sincere in my love for you, and in hungering to be your wife.

    The Big Drum A Comedy in Four Acts

  • The_ DUCHESS _is a daintily beautiful doll of about seven-and-thirty -- a_ poseuse, _outwardly dignified and stately when upon her guard, really a frail, shallow little creature full of extravagant sentimentality.

    The Gay Lord Quex A Comedy in Four Acts

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